Flesh for Frankenstein in 3D (and 2D) In The D!

DETROIT-1-17-75

1-17-75, Detroit – Suburban showing – See 7-12-74 for the 3D showing in Detroit.

Paul Morrissey’s Flesh for Frankenstein was one of the cinematic events of the Mid-70’s that shocked many viewers, repulsed a number of critics (always a good thing!), made some laugh (hopefully when they got the dark humor in it), and made it’s mark in Horror history in an era when the extremes were breaking down the barriers. Showing as Andy Warhol’s Frankenstein in The US distributed by Bryanston, a company created with the monies made from Deep Throat that already made controversial history with The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, the film was a serious success and a news-maker for it’s graphic Horror, it’s dramatics, and the over the top performance from star Udo Kier. The 3D used with the beautiful Gothic settings and it’s special effects must have been great to witness, but thankfully it’s looks wonderful in normal 2D and wide screen – notes about the first US VHS release later…

Through the Late 70’s and Early 80’s, it received two re-issues after Bryanston went quietly out of the business, one from Monarch with several showings in 3D and the other by Landmark exclusively in 3D – Landmark’s release being perfectly timed with the brief return of the process sparked by the surprise hit film Comin’ At Ya and thankfully with the re-issue of Dial M for Murder (which I saw at the Showcase Cinema).

This will look mainly at the Detroit ads plus those from a couple of other cities that are in my collection. More will seriously will be added on in the future.

 

CHI6-14-74WARHOLFRANK

6-14-74, Chicago at the Michael Todd theater, the home of the Smell-o-Vision film Scent of Mystery.

DETROIT-7-12-74

7-12-74, Detroit’s first run – The New Center Cinema (originally the Studio New Center) was the Arthouse theater in the Downtown area that sadly is not as remembered as the Grand Circus area theaters, the UA, or even the Summit. It closed a year or two after this.

ST-PETE8-30-74WARHOL-FRANKENSTEIN

8-30-74, St. Petersburg, FLA.

CHI9-6-74WARHOLFRANKENSTEIN

9-6-74, Chicago, Suburban showing.

 

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9-27-74, Toledo, highlighting the openness of some major cinemas to program an X-Rated film on one screen while showing something for the family on another back in the day.

OAKLAND-11-2-74

11-2-74, Oakland, CA, Suburban showing using the familiar “Stitches” art

MONTREAL-5-2-75

5-2-75, Montreal

 

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10-3-75, it’s return Double Feature 2D engagement with Blood for Dracula in Detroit. The Northgate was known for showing the big Exploitation films of the day (at least to the cinema ghouls like me). The films were re-rated R in a time when the X rating was seriously turning into a no-go mark for some newspapers (The Detroit News stopped carrying X-Rated ads since 1972!).

DETROIT-10-10-75-warhol

10-10-75, for appearances at three other Drive Ins. The Ford Wyoming was later known for showing Horror marathons in October through the Mid-80’s, Troma films, and the occasional splatter-feasts.

CHI10-24=75WARHOLHORRORD

10-24-75, the Double bill in Chicago

WILKMINGTON-OH-11-28-75

11-28-75, Wilmington, OH as the late show! The ad line from The Adult Version of Jekyll and Hide was thrown in by the theater.

TERRE-HAUTE-UA-INDIANA-2-13-76

2-13-76, Terre Haute, Indiana

OTTAWA-ONTARIO-CANADA-4-2-76

9-2-76, Ottawa, Ontario, in French!

A1-21-77FRANK

1-21-77, Detroit. Monarch Distribution also re-released Arch Olbler’s The Bubble as The Fantastic Invasion of Planet Earth and Walter Boos’ Love in 3D. It was infamous as the company that released Snuff, which played Detroit two different times in 1976!

TOlEDO101977

10-19-77, Toledo – a very good pairing with Dario Argento’s Suspiria!

CHI11-5-82WARHOL

11-5-82, Chicago

F11-5-82

11-5-82, Detroit

Reportedly, Ariel International Releasing unleashed a very horrendous full screen VHS in 1987 which showed only a third of the view and a clipping off to TV bars seconds before the final chord of the ending credits sequence, While interesting to watch today to see how some of us viewed the film then (it was at the local Video Connection, rented by me many times), it was not a very good video release which looked like that it was produced on a low budget, although it was unleashed in a good looking big box.. Thankfully Criterion and Image’s releases brought the full view to The US video fiends.

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~ by screen13 on April 4, 2016.

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